Authorization

Australia rushes its dangerous anti-encryption bill into parliament, despite massive opposition

Australias controversial anti-encryption bill is one step closer to becoming law, after the two leading but sparring party political giants struck a deal to pass the legislation.
The bill, in short, grants Australian police greater powers to issue technical notices a nice way of forcing companies even websites operating in Australia to help the government hack, implant malware, undermine encryption or insert backdoors at the behest of the government.
If companies refuse, they could face financial penalties.
Lawmakers say that the law is only meant to target serious criminals sex offenders, terrorists, homicide and drug offenses. Critics have pointed out that the law could allow mission creep into less serious offenses, such as copyright infringement, despite promises that compelled assistance requests are signed off by two senior government officials.
In all, the proposed provisions have been widely panned by experts, who argue that the bill is vague and contradictory, but powerful, and still contains dangerous loopholes. And, critics warn (as they have for years) that any technical backdoors that allow the government to access end-to-end encrypted messages could be exploited by hackers.
But thats unlikely to get in the way of the bills near-inevitable passing.
Australias ruling coalition government and its opposition Labor party agreed to have the bill put before parliament this week before its summer break.
Several lawmakers look set to reject the bill, criticizing the governments efforts to rush through the bill before the holiday.
Far from being a national security measure this bill will have the unintended consequence of diminishing the online safety, security and privacy of every single Australian, said Jordon Steele-John, a Greens senator, in a tweet.
Tim Watts, a Labor member of Parliament for Gellibrand, tweeted a long thread slamming the governments push to get the legislation passed before Christmas, despite more than 15,000 submissions to a public consultation, largely decrying the bills content.
The tech community arguably the most affected by the bills passing has also slammed the bill. Apple called it dangerously ambiguous, while Cisco and Mozilla joined a chorus of other tech firms calling for the government to dial back the provisions.
But the rhetoric isnt likely to dampen the rush by the global surveillance pact the U.S., U.K., Canada, Australia and New Zealand, known as the so-called Five Eyes group of nations to push for greater access to encrypted data. Only earlier this year, the governmental coalition said in no uncertain terms that it would force backdoors if companies werent willing to help their governments spy.
Australias likely to pass the bill but when exactly remains a mystery. The coalition government has to call an election in less than six months, putting the anti-encryption law on a timer.

Apple rebukes Australias dangerously ambiguous anti-encryption bill
See also:
Leave a comment
News
  • Latest
  • Read
  • Commented
Calendar Content
«     2018    »
 12
3456789
10111213141516
17181920212223
24252627282930
31