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U.S. develops new counter-hacking measures to deter attacks on strategic infrastructure

U.S. develops new counter-hacking measures to deter attacks on strategic infrastructure

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The White House is working on cutting-edge measures to counter hacker attacks on the strategically important objects of the American infrastructure. The Wall Street Journal reported that with the reference to sources in the government.
According to the outlet, Washington is concerned about the information about Russian hackers' intervention in the network of the country's energy sector; the cyber threats may come from Russia, China, Iran and North Korea, the article says.  
The developments imply more active use of arrest warrants, issued by Interpol, as well as sending requests to other governments, asking for the search and detention of suspects. The U.S. administration believes that these measures will limit the freedom of movement of hackers, making them flee justice in their homelands. Assets freeze and personal sanctions are also among the preferred activities, offered by the developers of new anti-hacker measures.
As we reported the United States arrested three Ukrainians. They are suspected of committing several cyber-crimes like theft of arrays of payment card numbers and other data of American companies. 
According to three federal indictments, Ukrainian nationals Dmytro Fedorov, 44, Fedir Hladyr, 33, and Andrii Kolpakov, 30, are members of a prolific hacking group widely known as FIN7 (also referred to as the Carbanak Group and the Navigator Group, among other names).  Since at least 2015, FIN7 members engaged in a highly sophisticated malware campaign targeting more than 100 U.S. companies, predominantly in the restaurant, gaming, and hospitality industries. As set forth in indictments, FIN7 hacked into thousands of computer systems and stole millions of customer credit and debit card numbers, which the group used or sold for profit.

In the United States alone, FIN7 successfully breached the computer networks of companies in 47 states and the District of Columbia, stealing more than 15 million customer card records from over 6,500 individual point-of-sale terminals at more than 3,600 separate business locations.  Additional intrusions occurred abroad, including in the United Kingdom, Australia, and France.  Companies that have publicly disclosed hacks attributable to FIN7 include such familiar chains as Chipotle Mexican Grill, Chili’s, Arby’s, Red Robin and Jason’s Deli. Additionally, in Western Washington, FIN7 targeted other local businesses.
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