Authorization

Over half of world's primates face extinction

Over half of world's primates face extinctionResearchers behind the paper, published in the journal Science Advances, called for urgent action to prevent mass extinction.

A new study has found that about 60 percent of primate species are threatened with extinction, while around 75 percent of species have declining populations.

The plight of primates comes as a result of human actions that kill animals directly and destroy habitats, according to a new review from more than 30 leading primatologists.

"This truly is the eleventh hour for many of these creatures," said University of Illinois anthropology professor Paul Garber, who co-wrote the study published Wednesday in the journal Science Advances.

Only a few thousand individuals remain in several species of lemurs, monkeys and apes, the report said.

Among these are the ring-tailed lemur, Udzunga red colobus monkey, Yunnan snub-nosed monkey and Grauer's gorilla.

Fewer than 30 Hainan gibbons, which live in China, remain alive, the report said.

Among the contributors to the decreased numbers of species are hunting, the illegal pet trade and loss of habitat to humans who continue to cut trees, build roads, mine and cultivate the land in primate habitats.

"These primates cling to life in the forests of countries such as China, Madagascar, Indonesia, Tanzania and the Democratic Republic of Congo," Garber said.

Just four countries are home to two thirds of all primate species: Brazil, DR Congo, Indonesia and Madagascar.

"Sadly, in the next 25 years, many of these primate species will disappear unless we make conservation a global priority," Garber said.

One solution, the researchers said, is easing human population growth, thereby keeping people from encroaching on primate territory.
See also:
Leave a comment
News
  • Latest
  • Read
  • Commented
Calendar Content
«    Июнь 2020    »
ПнВтСрЧтПтСбВс
1234567
891011121314
15161718192021
22232425262728
2930