Authorization

Fresh criticism for Apprenticeship Levy with calls for summit to improve it

The heavily criticised Apprenticeship Levy has come under fresh fire a year after its introduction with manufacturers demanding a government summit to fix they system they say needs “fundamental” reform.
Research by EEF, the trade body, says 95pc of manufacturers want the levy rejigged, and revealed that more than half of them think the system was not ready when it was launched.
Intended to raise close to ?3bn a year to fund training, the scheme draws in all companies with an annual wage bill of ?3m or more. Under the system, they must pay 0.5pc of the wage bill into a fund which they can then draw on to pay for training.
However, it has been dogged by criticism. Companies have claimed that many new training course accreditations are not ready, meaning they cannot spend the money they put into the levy, and the system is inflexible.
Some companies say it does not cover the full cost of complex training, such as in manufacturing, and there have been claims that it is encouraging the creation of low quality apprenticeships which do not deserve the name.?Other businesses – especially smaller ones – say it is too complicated to make it worth the bureaucracy it entails.
Fresh criticism for Apprenticeship Levy with calls for summit to improve it

A survey of the manufacturing industry revealed the level of frustration at the new scheme

Credit:
Getty 
EEF’s research of its members revealed that while 52pc want to keep the levy and applaud its general aim, they want it improved, with more than one in 10 companies saying they had put off employing an apprentice.
Official Department for Education data revealed a 24pc year-on-year drop in the number of people starting apprentices, with 206,100 people beginning the training courses in the six months to January.
Verity Davidge, head of education and skills at the trade group, said: “Creating high quality apprenticeships are essential if industry is going to access the skills it will need in the future.
“But while the levy had laudable aims, what should have been a win-win situation has turned into a lose-lose.”
Fresh criticism for Apprenticeship Levy with calls for summit to improve it

Improving training is essential to tackling Britain's growing skills shortage in engineering and manufacturing

Credit:
Getty
Official Department for Education data revealed a 24pc year-on-year drop in the number of people starting apprentices, with 206,100 people beginning the training courses in the six months to January, a decline of 63,500.
Verity Davidge, head of education and skills at the trade group, added: “Creating high quality apprenticeships are essential if industry is going to access the skills it will need in the future.
“But while the levy had laudable aims, what should have been a win-win situation has turned into a lose-lose,” she added. “We have to address the alarming drop in starts and look at positive solutions to make the levy work.”
The government has consistently defended the levy, saying it would “Work with employers on how the apprenticeship levy can be spent so that it works effectively and flexibly”.
See also:
Leave a comment
News
  • Latest
  • Read
  • Commented
Calendar Content
«    Май 2018    »
ПнВтСрЧтПтСбВс
 123456
78910111213
14151617181920
21222324252627
28293031