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Public Health Notice - Outbreaks of Salmonella infections linked to raw chicken, including frozen raw breaded chicken products

OTTAWA, May 25, 2019 /CNW/ - UpdateThis notice has been updated to reflect a new outbreak of SalmonellaA illnesses linked to frozen raw breaded chicken products, and a new food recall warningA that is related to illnesses reported in this active outbreak investigation.Why you should take noteThe Public Health Agency of Canada is collaborating with provincial and territorial public health partners, the Canadian Food Inspection Agency and Health Canada to investigate outbreaks of Salmonella infections across Canada linked to raw chicken, including frozen raw breaded chicken products.On September 13, 2018, Canada's Council of Chief Medical Officers of Health issued a statementA advising Canadians to follow proper food safety practices when handling, preparing or consuming frozen raw breaded chicken products such as chicken nuggets, chicken strips, chicken burgers, popcorn chicken and chicken fries. The Government of Canada and industry partners are continuing their efforts to educate consumers about the importance of safe food handling practices for these types of products; however, Salmonella illnesses linked to frozen raw breaded chicken products continue to be reported to the Public Health Agency of Canada.The Canadian Food Inspection Agency has implementedA new industry measuresA for controlling the risk ofA SalmonellaA in frozen raw breaded chicken products. These new measures were prompted by the continued link between frozen raw breaded chicken products and outbreaks of food-related illnesses.A The measures took effect on April 1, 2019; however, it is possible that products produced prior to this date could still be in the marketplace or in people's freezers for up to a year beyond April 1. This is why consumers are being reminded to take precautions and to follow safe food handling practices when handling, preparing and consuming these types of products.When not thoroughly cooked, frozen breaded chicken products containing raw chicken pose an increased health risk to individuals who handle, prepare or consume them.You can significantly reduce your risk of getting sick by handling and preparing these products with caution. Always follow cooking instructions carefully and verify the internal temperature after cooking, as recommended, before consuming these products. Frozen raw breaded chicken products and raw chicken pieces must be cooked to an internal temperature of at least 74A°C (165A°F) to ensure that they are safe to eat. Whole chicken needs to be cooked to an internal temperature of 82A°C (180A°F).Summary of investigationsIn May 2017, Government of Canada scientists began using a new technology called "whole genome sequencing" to help identify and respond to outbreaks. Since that time, federal, provincial and territorial health and food safety partners have investigated 18 national outbreaks linked to raw chicken, including frozen raw breaded chicken products. In total, there have been 15 food products linked to these outbreak investigations. The Canadian Food Inspection Agency has issuedA food recall warnings for 14 products. One product was removed from the marketplace by the retailer.As of May 25, 2019, there have been 584 laboratory-confirmed cases of Salmonella illness investigated as part of the illness outbreaks across the country: British Columbia (44), Alberta (85), Saskatchewan (18), Manitoba (29), Ontario (215), Quebec (119), New Brunswick (31), Nova Scotia (19), Prince Edward Island (7), Newfoundland and Labrador (12), Northwest Territories (2), Yukon (1), and Nunavut (2). There have been 97 individuals hospitalized as part of these outbreaks. Three individuals have died; however, Salmonella was not the cause of death for two of those individuals, and it was not determined whether Salmonella contributed to the cause of death for the third individual. Infections have occurred in Canadians of all ages and genders.All active and future Salmonella outbreak investigations linked to raw chicken, including frozen raw breaded chicken products, and related food recall warnings will be listed in theA next sectionA of the public health notice to remind Canadians of the ongoing risk associated with these types of food products.Active investigationsAs of May 25, 2019, there is one active national Salmonella outbreak investigation linked to raw chicken including frozen raw breaded chicken products, coordinated by the Public Health Agency of Canada.May 25, 2019 (NEW) - Salmonella Enteritidis

Currently, there are 11 cases of illness in seven provinces linked to this outbreak: British Columbia (2), Alberta (1), Ontario (2), Quebec (3), New Brunswick (1), Nova Scotia (1), and Prince Edward Island (1). Individuals became sick between September 2018 and April 2019. One individual has been hospitalized. No deaths have been reported. Frozen raw breaded chicken products have been identified as a source of this outbreak.

Product recall onA May 24, 2019

Compliments Chicken Strips (907g) with a best before date of November 24, 2019, EST 374. UPC - 0 55742 33687 0. The product was sold nationally until May 1, 2019 but some consumers may still have it in their freezer.

Canadians are advised not to consume the recalled product, and retailers and restaurants are advised to not sell or serve the recalled product.Information about previously investigated and currently closed national Salmonella outbreak investigations linked to raw chicken including frozen raw breaded chicken products, coordinated by the Public Health Agency of Canada since May 2017 is available atA the end of this notice.Who is most at riskAnyone can become sick with a Salmonella infection, but infants, children, seniors and those with weakened immune systems are at higher risk of serious illness because their immune systems are more fragile.Most people who become ill from a Salmonella infection will recover fully after a few days. It is possible for some people to be infected with the bacteria and to not get sick or show any symptoms, but to still be able to spread the infection to others.What you should do to protect your healthCheck to see whether you have theA recalled frozen raw breaded chicken productsA in your home or place of business. If you do:

Do not use or eat theA recalled products. Secure the recalled products in a plastic bag and then either throw them out or return them to the store where they were purchased.



If you do not have the original packaging of a frozen raw breaded chicken product and you are unsure of whether it is included in the food recall warnings, throw it out just to be safe.

Wash your hands with soap and warm water immediately following any contact with a recalled product.Beyond recalled food items, frozen raw breaded chicken products may appear to be pre-cooked or browned, but they may contain raw chicken and should be handled and prepared no differently from other raw chicken products.If you are preparing breaded chicken products, such as nuggets, strips, burgers or fries, the following precautions should be taken to protect your health:

Do not eat raw or undercooked frozen breaded chicken products. Cook all frozen raw breaded chicken products to an internal temperature of at least 74A°C (165A°F) to ensure that they are safe to eat. Use a digital food thermometer to verify the temperature. Insert the digital food thermometer through the side of the product, all the way to the middle. Oven-safe meat thermometers that are designed for testing whole chicken and roasts during cooking are not suitable for testing nuggets, strips or burgers.



Microwave cooking of frozen raw breaded chicken products a?? including chicken nuggets, strips, burgers, popcorn chicken or chicken fries a?? is not recommended because of the possibility of uneven heating.



Always follow the cooking instructions on the package, including for products labelled Uncooked, Cook and Serve, Ready to Cook, and Oven Ready.



Wash your hands thoroughly with soap and warm water before and after handling frozen raw breaded chicken products.



Use a separate plate, cutting board and utensils when handling frozen raw breaded chicken products to prevent the spread of harmful bacteria.



Do not re-use plates, cutting boards or utensils that have come in contact with frozen raw breaded chicken products to serve the cooked product unless they have been thoroughly washed.

Foods carrying Salmonella may look, smell and taste normal, so it's important to follow safe food-handling tips for buying, chilling, thawing, cleaning, cooking, and storing any chicken products:

Wash your hands thoroughly with soap and warm water before and after handling all types of raw chicken.



Always follow the cooking instructions provided on the package. Cook chicken to a safe internal temperature that has been checked using a digital thermometer. Raw chicken pieces should be cooked to an internal temperature of 74A°C (165A°F). Whole chicken should be cooked to an internal temperature of 82A°C (180A°F).



Keep raw chicken away from other food while shopping, storing, repackaging, cooking and serving foods.



Never rinse chicken before using it because the bacteria can spread everywhere the water splashes, creating more of a hazard.



Use warm, soapy water to clean knives, cutting boards, utensils, your hands, and any surfaces that have come in contact with food, especially meat, chicken and fish.



If you have been diagnosed with a Salmonella infection or any other gastrointestinal illness, do not cook food for other people.



For more information, read ourA poultry safety fact sheet.

SymptomsSymptoms of aA Salmonella infection, called salmonellosis, typically start 6 to 72A hours after exposure to Salmonella bacteria from an infected animal or contaminated product.Symptoms include:

fever



chills



diarrhea



abdominal cramps



headache



nausea



vomiting

These symptoms usually last for four to seven days. In healthy people, salmonellosis often clears up without treatment. In some cases, severe illness and hospitalization may occur. In some cases, antibiotics may be required. People who are infected with Salmonella bacteria can be infectious from several days to several weeks. People who experience symptoms, or who have underlying medical conditions, should contact their health care provider if they suspect they have a Salmonella infection.What the Government of Canada is doingThe Government of Canada is committed to food safety. The Public Health Agency of Canada leads the human health investigation into an outbreak and is in regular contact with its federal, provincial and territorial partners to monitor the situation and to collaborate on steps to address an outbreak.Health Canada provides food-related health risk assessments to determine whether the presence of a certain substance or microorganism poses a health risk to consumers.The Canadian Food Inspection Agency conducts food safety investigations into the possible food source of an outbreak.The Government of Canada will continue to update Canadians as new information related to these investigations becomes available.Additional information

New Requirements for Industry to Reduce Salmonella



Frozen Raw Breaded Chicken



Salmonella



Poultry Safety



General Food Safety Tips



Recalls and safety alerts mobile application

A SOURCE Public Health Agency of Canada
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