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American parents might be agonizing over their kids' piano lessons, soccer games, and SAT scores, but it's hiding a deeper anxiety

American parents might be agonizing over their kids' piano lessons, soccer games, and SAT scores, but it's hiding a deeper anxiety
Michael H/Getty



American parents today are spending more time, effort, and money raising their kids than previous generations, according to a New York Times story.




They're motivated by ensuring their children are better off — or at least not worse off — financially than they are.




Those born in the 1980s are at the greatest risk of becoming a "lost generation" for wealth accumulation, according to an earlier report from the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis.



Most parents today share at least one common goal: They want to give their kid a better life than they had.
Part of that is ensuring their children end up better off financially, and it's led to a new brand of "intensive parenting" in America, according to a recent story in the New York Times.
"Over just a couple of generations, parents have greatly increased the amount of time, attention, and money they put into raising children. Mothers who juggle jobs outside the home spend just as much time tending their children as stay-at-home mothers did in the 1970s," wrote Times reporter Claire Cain Miller.
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