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Paying kids for doing chores could teach them to be entitled rather than helpful, says a professor who studies wealth inequality

Paying kids for doing chores could teach them to be entitled rather than helpful, says a professor who studies wealth inequality
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Paying kids for chores could be teaching them entitlement, according to a sociologist quoted in a recent article published on The Atlantic.




Families around the world, or even American families outside the upper middle class, don't give money to kids in exchange for completing expected duties.




Tying money to chores could make kids expect to be paid for fulfilling basic responsibilities.



Allowances aren't what they used to be. Instead of teaching children the value of money, an allowance could be teaching children entitlement.
So says Lehigh University sociologist Heather Beth Johnson, who studies families and wealth inequality.
"When we pay [kids] to do things that humans have always had to do as participants of communities and families, it sends them some sort of a message that they are entitled to [an] exchange for these things," Johnson told Joe Pinsker of The Atlantic in an article about allowances.
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