Authorization

Coronavirus: Chancellor Rishi Sunak sorry for not being able to protect all jobs

https://ichef.bbci.co.uk/news/320/cpsprodpb/55A0/production/_113302912_sunakbbcbreakfast-002.jpg" width="976" height="549">
The chancellor has said he is "sorry" for not helping "everyone in exactly the way they would have wanted".Rishi Sunak said the government was "throwing everything" at stemming job losses with a He also admitted that some of the ?1,000 bonuses being offered to take back furloughed staff would go to firms that were already keeping workers on.Labour has called for a more targeted approach to saving jobs, saying the government will "waste billions at a time when others are crying out for support".
Anger as locked-down Leicester denied extra cash
Chancellor gives diners 50% off on eating out
Summer Statement: Key points at a glance
In his summer statement on Wednesday, Mr Sunak said the "jobs retention bonus" could cost as much as ?9bn if every worker currently furloughed is kept on.It comes as figures released by the Treasury reveal that public spending on the battle against coronavirus has risen to nearly ?190bn. Mr Sunak told BBC Breakfast: "If you're asking me 'can I protect every single job' of course the answer is no."'Is unemployment going to rise, are people going to lose their jobs?' Yes, and the scale of this is significant."We are entering one of the most severe recessions this country has ever seen. That is of course going to have a significant impact on unemployment and on job losses."
'Zero income'
Self-employed curtain fitter Mark Whittaker told BBC Breakfast he cannot "get his head round how the chancellor expects any citizen of this country to get by on zero income"."If he can manage it, please tell me how to do it," Mr Whittaker said. "I don't want a handout… I want parity."
https://ichef.bbci.co.uk/images/ic/720x405/p08k86s2.jpg">
Media playback is unsupported on your device
“I don’t want a handout… I want parity and that’s it.”
Mr Whittaker started his own business in Stockport, Greater Manchester, towards the end of 2018 and fell short of earnings requirements to receive support during the crisis.He said people in his situation have children, mortgages, rent and bills to pay.Responding to Mr Whittaker's comments, Mr Sunak said more than 2.5 million people who are self-employed will receive support from a "generous" scheme of government funding.He added: "Have we been able to help everyone in exactly the way they would have wanted
'Dead weight'
The chancellor announced a series of measures to help the economy on Wednesday, including a VAT cut for the hospitality and tourism sectors, a bonus scheme for employers and an eating out money off scheme for August.Mr Sunak said the ?1,000 bonus being offered to businesses that keep furloughed staff in jobs until January would be a "dead weight" cost, as some employers who intend to retain workers anyway would benefit.The Chancellor told BBC Radio 4's Today programme: "Throughout this crisis I've had decisions to make and whether to act in a broad way at scale and at speed or to act in a more targeted and nuanced way."In an ideal world, you're absolutely right, you would minimise that dead weight and do everything in incredibly targeted fashion."The problem is the severity of what was happening to our economy, the scale of what was happening, and indeed the speed that it was happening at demanded a different response."He said that "without question there will be dead weight - and there has been dead weight in all of the interventions we have put in place".But Labour's shadow chief secretary to the Treasury Bridget Philipson said: "The chancellor should be targeting support on those who need it, not handing it out aimlessly to those who don't."It's not brave to admit the government plans to waste billions at a time when others are crying out for support."We are looking to speak to people who used previous unemployment schemes to get work - is that you? Did the 'Future Jobs Fund' in 2009 help you get a job? How useful was it for you in developing your career? Share your experiences by emailing haveyoursay@bbc.co.uk.Please include a contact number if you are willing to speak to a BBC journalist.
WhatsApp: +44 7756 165803
Tweet: @BBC_HaveYourSay
Send pictures/video to yourpics@bbc.co.uk
Upload your pictures / video here
Please read our terms & conditions and privacy policy
Or use the form below:
Your contact details
Name
(optional)
Your E-mail address
(required)
Town & Country
(optional)
Your telephone number
(optional)
Comments
(required)
If you are happy to be contacted by a BBC journalist please leave a telephone number that we can
contact you on. In some cases a selection of your comments will be published, displaying your name as
you provide it and location, unless you state otherwise. Your contact details will never be published.
When sending us pictures, video or eyewitness accounts at no time should you endanger yourself or others,
take any unnecessary risks or infringe any laws. Please ensure you have read the terms and conditions.
Terms and conditions
The BBC's Privacy Policy
Rishi Sunak
UK economy
Coronavirus pandemic
See also:
Leave a comment
News
  • Latest
  • Read
  • Commented
Calendar Content
«    Август 2020    »
ПнВтСрЧтПтСбВс
 12
3456789
10111213141516
17181920212223
24252627282930
31